the parable of zoltan and his twelve sheep, or why a little skepticism goes a long way

What follows is a fictional piece about sheep and statistics. I wrote it about two years ago, intending it to serve as a preface to an article on the dangers of inadvertent data fudging. But then I decided that no journal editor in his or her right mind would accept an article that started out … Continue reading the parable of zoltan and his twelve sheep, or why a little skepticism goes a long way

got R? get social science for R!

Drew Conway has a great list of 10 must-have R packages for social scientists. If you’re a social scientist (or really, any kind of scientist) who doesn’t use R, now is a great time to dive in and learn; there are tons of tutorials and guides out there (my favorite is Quick-R, which is incredibly … Continue reading got R? get social science for R!

specificity statistics for ROI analyses: a simple proposal

The brain is a big place. In the context of fMRI analysis, what that bigness means is that a typical 3D image of the brain might contain anywhere from 50,000 – 200,000 distinct voxels (3D pixels). Any of those voxels could theoretically show meaningful activation in relation to some contrast of interest, so the only … Continue reading specificity statistics for ROI analyses: a simple proposal

a well-written mainstream article on fMRI?!

Craig Bennett, of prefrontal.org and dead salmon fame, links to a really great Science News article on the promises and pitfalls of fMRI. As Bennett points out, the real gem of the article is the “quote of the week” from Nikos Logethetis (which I won’t spoil for you here; you’ll have to do just a … Continue reading a well-written mainstream article on fMRI?!

every day is national lab day

This week’s issue of Science has a news article about National Lab Day, a White House-supported initiative to pair up teachers and scientists in an effort to improve STEM education nation-wide. As the article notes, National Lab Day is a bit of a misnomer, seeing as the goal is to encourage a range of educational … Continue reading every day is national lab day

building a cumulative science of human brain function at CNS

Earlier today, I received an email saying that a symposium I submitted for the next CNS meeting was accepted for inclusion in the program. I’m pretty excited about this; I think the topic of the symposium is a really important one, and this will be a great venue to discuss some of the relevant issues. … Continue reading building a cumulative science of human brain function at CNS