what Paul Meehl might say about graduate school admissions

Sanjay Srivastava has an excellent post up today discussing the common belief among many academics (or at least psychologists) that graduate school admission interviews aren’t very predictive of actual success, and should be assigned little or no weight when making admissions decisions: The argument usually goes something like this: “All the evidence from personnel selection … Continue reading what Paul Meehl might say about graduate school admissions

some people are irritable, but everyone likes to visit museums: what personality inventories tell us about how we’re all just like one another

I’ve recently started recruiting participants for online experiments via Mechanical Turk. In the past I’ve always either relied on on directory listings (like this one) or targeted specific populations (e.g., bloggers and twitterers) via email solicitation. But recently I’ve started running a very large-sample decision-making study (it’s here, if you care to contribute to the … Continue reading some people are irritable, but everyone likes to visit museums: what personality inventories tell us about how we’re all just like one another

Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

Distinguishing good science from bad science isn’t an easy thing to do. One big problem is that what constitutes ‘good’ work is, to a large extent, subjective; I might love a paper you hate, or vice versa. Another problem is that science is a cumulative enterprise, and the value of each discovery is, in some … Continue reading Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation