in which I suffer a minor setback due to hyperbolic discounting

I wrote a paper with some collaborators that was officially published today in Nature Methods (though it’s been available online for a few weeks). I spent a year of my life on this (a YEAR! That’s like 30 years in opossum years!), so go read the abstract, just to humor me. It’s about large-scale automated … Continue reading in which I suffer a minor setback due to hyperbolic discounting

sunbathers in America

This is fiction. Kind of. Science left for a few days and asked fiction to care for the house. I ran into my friend, Cornelius Kipling, at the grocery store. He was ahead of me in line, holding a large eggplant and a copy of the National Enquirer. I didn’t ask about it. I hadn’t … Continue reading sunbathers in America

we, the people, who make mistakes–economists included

Andrew Gelman discusses a “puzzle that’s been bugging [him] for a while“: Pop economists (or, at least, pop micro-economists) are often making one of two arguments: 1. People are rational and respond to incentives. Behavior that looks irrational is actually completely rational once you think like an economist. 2. People are irrational and they need … Continue reading we, the people, who make mistakes–economists included

amusing evidence of a lazy cut and paste job

In the course of a literature search, I came across the following abstract, from a 1990 paper titled “Taking People at Face Value: Evidence for the Kernel of Truth Hypothesis”, and taken directly from the publisher’s website: Two studies examined the validity of impressions based on static facial appearance. In Study 1, the content of … Continue reading amusing evidence of a lazy cut and paste job