deconstructing the turducken

This is fiction. Which means it’s entirely made up, and definitely not at all based on any real people or events.   Cornelius Kipling came over to our house for Thanksgiving. I didn’t invite him; I would never, ever invite him. He was guaranteed to show up slightly drunk and very belligerent, carrying a two-thirds empty … Continue reading deconstructing the turducken

a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

Tor Wager and I have a “news and views” piece in Nature Methods this week; we discuss a paper by Mantini and colleagues (in the same issue) introducing a new method for identifying functional brain homologies across different species–essentially, identifying brain regions in humans and monkeys that seem to do roughly the same thing even if they’re … Continue reading a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

no free lunch in statistics

Simon and Tibshirani recently posted a short comment on the Reshef et al MIC data mining paper I blogged about a while back: The proposal of Reshef et. al. (“MIC”) is an interesting new approach for discovering non-linear dependencies among pairs of measurements in exploratory data mining. However, it has a potentially serious drawback. The authors laud … Continue reading no free lunch in statistics