A very classy reply from Karl Friston

After writing my last post critiquing Karl Friston’s commentary in NeuroImage, I emailed him the link, figuring he might want the opportunity to respond, and also to make sure he knew my commentary wasn’t intended as a personal attack (I have enormous respect for his seminal contributions to the field of neuroimaging). Here’s his very … Continue reading A very classy reply from Karl Friston

Sixteen is not magic: Comment on Friston (2012)

UPDATE: I’ve posted a very classy email response from Friston here. In a “comments and controversies” piece published in NeuroImage last week, Karl Friston describes “Ten ironic rules for non-statistical reviewers”. As the title suggests, the piece is presented ironically; Friston frames it as a series of guidelines reviewers can follow in order to ensure … Continue reading Sixteen is not magic: Comment on Friston (2012)

in which I apologize for my laziness, but not really

I got back from the Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting last week. I was planning to write a post-CNS wrap-up thing like I did last year and the year before that, but I seem to have misplaced the energy that’s supposed to fuel such an exercise. So instead I’ll just say I had a great time and … Continue reading in which I apologize for my laziness, but not really

on writing: some anecdotal observations, in no particular order

Early on in graduate school, I invested in the book “How to Write a Lot“. I enjoyed reading it–mostly because I (mistakenly) enjoyed thinking to myself, “hey, I bet as soon as I finish this book, I’m going to start being super productive!” But I can save you the $9 and tell you there’s really … Continue reading on writing: some anecdotal observations, in no particular order