Internal consistency is overrated, or How I learned to stop worrying and love shorter measures, Part I

[This is the first of a two-part series motivating and introducing precis, a Python package for automated abbreviation of psychometric measures. In part I, I motivate the search for shorter measures by arguing that internal consistency is highly overrated. In part II, I describe some software that makes it relatively easy to act on this … Continue reading Internal consistency is overrated, or How I learned to stop worrying and love shorter measures, Part I

The reviewer’s dilemma, or why you shouldn’t get too meta when you’re supposed to be writing a review that’s already overdue

When I review papers for journals, I often find myself facing something of a tension between two competing motives. On the one hand, I’d like to evaluate each manuscript as an independent contribution to the scientific literature–i.e., without having to worry about how the manuscript stacks up against other potential manuscripts I could be reading. … Continue reading The reviewer’s dilemma, or why you shouldn’t get too meta when you’re supposed to be writing a review that’s already overdue

what aspirin can tell us about the value of antidepressants

There’s a nice post on Science-Based Medicine by Harriet Hall pushing back (kind of) against the increasingly popular idea that antidepressants don’t work. For context, there have been a couple of large recent meta-analyses that used comprehensive FDA data on clinical trials of antidepressants (rather than only published studies, which are biased towards larger, statistically … Continue reading what aspirin can tell us about the value of antidepressants

some people are irritable, but everyone likes to visit museums: what personality inventories tell us about how we’re all just like one another

I’ve recently started recruiting participants for online experiments via Mechanical Turk. In the past I’ve always either relied on on directory listings (like this one) or targeted specific populations (e.g., bloggers and twitterers) via email solicitation. But recently I’ve started running a very large-sample decision-making study (it’s here, if you care to contribute to the … Continue reading some people are irritable, but everyone likes to visit museums: what personality inventories tell us about how we’re all just like one another

Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

Distinguishing good science from bad science isn’t an easy thing to do. One big problem is that what constitutes ‘good’ work is, to a large extent, subjective; I might love a paper you hate, or vice versa. Another problem is that science is a cumulative enterprise, and the value of each discovery is, in some … Continue reading Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

some thoughtful comments on automatic measure abbreviation

In the comments on my last post, Sanjay Srivastava had some excellent thoughts/concerns about the general approach of automating measure abbreviation using a genetic algorithm. They’re valid concerns that might come up for other people too, so I thought I’d discuss them here in more detail. Here’s Sanjay: Lew Goldberg emailed me a copy of … Continue reading some thoughtful comments on automatic measure abbreviation