Internal consistency is overrated, or How I learned to stop worrying and love shorter measures, Part I

[This is the first of a two-part series motivating and introducing precis, a Python package for automated abbreviation of psychometric measures. In part I, I motivate the search for shorter measures by arguing that internal consistency is highly overrated. In part II, I describe some software that makes it relatively easy to act on this … Continue reading Internal consistency is overrated, or How I learned to stop worrying and love shorter measures, Part I

What we can and can’t learn from the Many Labs Replication Project

By now you will most likely have heard about the “Many Labs” Replication Project (MLRP)–a 36-site, 12-country, 6,344-subject effort to try to replicate a variety of classical and not-so-classical findings in psychology. You probably already know that the authors tested a variety of different effects–some recent, some not so recent (the oldest one dates back … Continue reading What we can and can’t learn from the Many Labs Replication Project

the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

You could be forgiven for thinking that academic psychologists have all suddenly turned into professional whistleblowers. Everywhere you look, interesting new papers are cropping up purporting to describe this or that common-yet-shady methodological practice, and telling us what we can collectively do to solve the problem and improve the quality of the published literature. In … Continue reading the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

bio-, chemo-, neuro-, eco-informatics… why no psycho-?

The latest issue of the APS Observer features a special section on methods. I contributed a piece discussing the need for a full-fledged discipline of psychoinformatics: Scientific progress depends on our ability to harness and apply modern information technology. Many advances in the biological and social sciences now emerge directly from advances in the large-scale acquisition, … Continue reading bio-, chemo-, neuro-, eco-informatics… why no psycho-?

a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

Tor Wager and I have a “news and views” piece in Nature Methods this week; we discuss a paper by Mantini and colleagues (in the same issue) introducing a new method for identifying functional brain homologies across different species–essentially, identifying brain regions in humans and monkeys that seem to do roughly the same thing even if they’re … Continue reading a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

large-scale data exploration, MIC-style

UPDATE 2/8/2012: Simon & Tibshirani posted a critical commentary on this paper here. See additional thoughts here. Real-world data are messy. Relationships between two variables can take on an infinite number of forms, and while one doesn’t see, say, umbrella-shaped data very often, strange things can happen. When scientists talk about correlations or associations between … Continue reading large-scale data exploration, MIC-style

see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

  UPDATE: the webcast is now archived here for posterity. This is kind of late notice and probably of interest to few people, but I’m giving the NIF webinar tomorrow (or today, depending on your time zone–either way, we’re talking about November 1st). I’ll be talking about Neurosynth, and focusing in particular on the methods … Continue reading see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

Distinguishing good science from bad science isn’t an easy thing to do. One big problem is that what constitutes ‘good’ work is, to a large extent, subjective; I might love a paper you hate, or vice versa. Another problem is that science is a cumulative enterprise, and the value of each discovery is, in some … Continue reading Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

Unless you’ve been pleasantly napping under a rock for the last couple of months, there’s a good chance you’ve heard about a forthcoming article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (JPSP) purporting to provide strong evidence for the existence of some ESP-like phenomenon. (If you’ve been napping, see here, here, here, here, here, … Continue reading The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

does functional specialization exist in the language system?

One of the central questions in cognitive neuroscience–according to some people, at least–is how selective different chunks of cortex are for specific cognitive functions. The paradigmatic examples of functional selectivity are pretty much all located in sensory cortical regions or adjacent association cortices. For instance, the fusiform face area (FFA), is so named because it … Continue reading does functional specialization exist in the language system?