Neurosynth is joining the Elsevier family

[Editorial note: this was originally posted on April 1, 2016. Interpret accordingly.] As many people who follow this blog will be aware, much of my research effort over the past few years has been dedicated to developing Neurosynth—a framework for large-scale, automated meta-analysis of neuroimaging data. Neurosynth has expanded steadily over time, with an ever-increasing … Continue reading Neurosynth is joining the Elsevier family

Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

In my last post, I wrote a long commentary on a recent PNAS article by Lieberman & Eisenberger claiming to find evidence that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is “selective for pain” using my Neurosynth framework for large-scale fMRI meta-analysis. I argued that nothing about Neurosynth supports any of L&E’s major conclusions, and that they … Continue reading Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

[Update 12/10/2015: Lieberman & Eisenberger have now posted a lengthy response to this post here. I’ll post my own reply to their reply in the next few days.] [Update 12/14/2015: I’ve posted an even lengthier reply to L&E’s reply here.] [Update 12/16/2015: Alex Shackman has posted an interesting commentary of his own on the L&E paper. … Continue reading No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

what exactly is it that 53% of neuroscience articles fail to do?

[UPDATE: Jake Westfall points out in the comments that the paper discussed here appears to have made a pretty fundamental mistake that I then carried over to my post. I’ve updated the post accordingly.] [UPDATE 2: the lead author has now responded and answered my initial question and some follow-up concerns.] A new paper in Nature Neuroscience … Continue reading what exactly is it that 53% of neuroscience articles fail to do?

unconference in Leipzig! no bathroom breaks!

Many (most?) regular readers of this blog have probably been to at least one academic conference. Some of you even have the misfortune of attending conferences regularly. And a still-smaller fraction of you scholarly deviants might conceivably even enjoy the freakish experience. You know, that whole thing where you get to roam around the streets … Continue reading unconference in Leipzig! no bathroom breaks!

a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

Tor Wager and I have a “news and views” piece in Nature Methods this week; we discuss a paper by Mantini and colleagues (in the same issue) introducing a new method for identifying functional brain homologies across different species–essentially, identifying brain regions in humans and monkeys that seem to do roughly the same thing even if they’re … Continue reading a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

the New York Times blows it big time on brain imaging

The New York Times has a terrible, terrible Op-Ed piece today by Martin Lindstrom (who I’m not going to link to, because I don’t want to throw any more bones his way). If you believe Lindstrom, you don’t just like your iPhone a lot; you love it. Literally. And the reason you love it, shockingly, … Continue reading the New York Times blows it big time on brain imaging

CNS 2011: a first-person shorthand account in the manner of Rocky Steps

Friday, April 1 4 pm. Arrive at SFO International on bumpy flight from Denver. 4:45 pm. Approach well-dressed man downtown and open mouth to ask for directions to Hyatt Regency San Francisco. “Sorry,” says well-dressed man, “No change to give.” Back off slowly, swinging bags, beard, and poster tube wildly, mumbling “I’m not a panhandler, … Continue reading CNS 2011: a first-person shorthand account in the manner of Rocky Steps

the naming of things

Let’s suppose you were charged with the important task of naming all the various subdisciplines of neuroscience that have anything to do with the field of research we now know as psychology. You might come up with some or all of the following terms, in no particular order: Neuropsychology Biological psychology Neurology Cognitive neuroscience Cognitive … Continue reading the naming of things

the Bactrian camel and prefrontal cortex: evidence from somatosensory function

I’ve been swamped with work lately, and don’t expect to see the light at the end of the tunnel for a few more weeks, so there won’t be any serious blogging here for the foreseeable future. But on a completely frivolous note, someone reminded me the other day of a cognitive neuroscience paper title generator … Continue reading the Bactrian camel and prefrontal cortex: evidence from somatosensory function