Yes, your research is very noble. No, that’s not a reason to flout copyright law.

Scientific research is cumulative; many elements of a typical research project would not and could not exist but for the efforts of many previous researchers. This goes not only for knowledge, but also for measurement. In much of the clinical world–and also in many areas of “basic” social and life science research–people routinely save themselves … Continue reading Yes, your research is very noble. No, that’s not a reason to flout copyright law.

There is no “tone” problem in psychology

Much ink has been spilled in the last week or so over the so-called “tone” problem in psychology, and what to do about it. I speak here, of course, of the now infamous (and as-yet unpublished) APS Observer column by APS Past President Susan Fiske, in which she argues rather strenuously that psychology is in danger of … Continue reading There is no “tone” problem in psychology

Neurosynth is joining the Elsevier family

[Editorial note: this was originally posted on April 1, 2016. April 1 is a day marked by a general lack of seriousness. Interpret this post accordingly.] As many people who follow this blog will be aware, much of my research effort over the past few years has been dedicated to developing Neurosynth—a framework for large-scale, … Continue reading Neurosynth is joining the Elsevier family

“Open Source, Open Science” Meeting Report – March 2015

[The report below was collectively authored by participants at the Open Source, Open Science meeting, and has been cross-posted in other places.] On March 19th and 20th, the Center for Open Science hosted a small meeting in Charlottesville, VA, convened by COS and co-organized by Kaitlin Thaney (Mozilla Science Lab) and Titus Brown (UC Davis). People working … Continue reading “Open Source, Open Science” Meeting Report – March 2015