strong opinions about data sharing mandates–mine included

Apparently, many scientists have rather strong feelings about data sharing mandates. In the wake of PLOS’s recent announcement–which says that, effective now, all papers published in PLOS journals must deposit their data in a publicly accessible location–a veritable gaggle of scientists have taken to their blogs to voice their outrage and/or support for the policy. … Continue reading strong opinions about data sharing mandates–mine included

What we can and can’t learn from the Many Labs Replication Project

By now you will most likely have heard about the “Many Labs” Replication Project (MLRP)–a 36-site, 12-country, 6,344-subject effort to try to replicate a variety of classical and not-so-classical findings in psychology. You probably already know that the authors tested a variety of different effects–some recent, some not so recent (the oldest one dates back … Continue reading What we can and can’t learn from the Many Labs Replication Project

…and then there were two!

Last year when I launched my lab (which, full disclosure, is really just me, plus some of my friends who were kind enough to let me plaster their names and faces on my website), I decided to call it the Psychoinformatics Lab (or PILab for short and pretentious), because, well, why not. It seemed to … Continue reading …and then there were two!

the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

If you’ve visited the Neurosynth website lately, you may have noticed that it looks… the same way it’s always looked. It hasn’t really changed in the last ~20 months, despite the vague promise on the front page that in the next few months, we’re going to do X, Y, Z to improve the functionality. The … Continue reading the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

tracking replication attempts in psychology–for real this time

I’ve written a few posts on this blog about how the development of better online infrastructure could help address and even solve many of the problems psychologists and other scientists face (e.g., the low reliability of peer review, the ‘fudge factor’ in statistical reporting, the sheer size of the scientific literature, etc.). Actually, that general … Continue reading tracking replication attempts in psychology–for real this time

see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

  UPDATE: the webcast is now archived here for posterity. This is kind of late notice and probably of interest to few people, but I’m giving the NIF webinar tomorrow (or today, depending on your time zone–either way, we’re talking about November 1st). I’ll be talking about Neurosynth, and focusing in particular on the methods … Continue reading see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

in which I suffer a minor setback due to hyperbolic discounting

I wrote a paper with some collaborators that was officially published today in Nature Methods (though it’s been available online for a few weeks). I spent a year of my life on this (a YEAR! That’s like 30 years in opossum years!), so go read the abstract, just to humor me. It’s about large-scale automated … Continue reading in which I suffer a minor setback due to hyperbolic discounting

The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

Unless you’ve been pleasantly napping under a rock for the last couple of months, there’s a good chance you’ve heard about a forthcoming article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (JPSP) purporting to provide strong evidence for the existence of some ESP-like phenomenon. (If you’ve been napping, see here, here, here, here, here, … Continue reading The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

what the arsenic effect means for scientific publishing

I don’t know very much about DNA (and by ‘not very much’ I sadly mean ‘next to nothing’), so when someone tells me that life as we know it generally doesn’t use arsenic to make DNA, and that it’s a big deal to find a bacterium that does, I’m willing to believe them. So too, … Continue reading what the arsenic effect means for scientific publishing

what the Dunning-Kruger effect is and isn’t

If you regularly read cognitive science or psychology blogs (or even just the lowly New York Times!), you’ve probably heard of something called the Dunning-Kruger effect. The Dunning-Kruger effect refers to the seemingly pervasive tendency of poor performers to overestimate their abilities relative to other people–and, to a lesser extent, for high performers to underestimate … Continue reading what the Dunning-Kruger effect is and isn’t