the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

If you’ve visited the Neurosynth website lately, you may have noticed that it looks… the same way it’s always looked. It hasn’t really changed in the last ~20 months, despite the vague promise on the front page that in the next few months, we’re going to do X, Y, Z to improve the functionality. The … Continue reading the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

estimating bias in text with Ruby

Over the past couple of months, I’ve been working on and off on a collaboration with my good friend Nick Holtzman and some other folks that focuses on ways to automatically extract bias from text using a vector space model. The paper is still in progress, so I won’t give much away here, except to … Continue reading estimating bias in text with Ruby

links and slides from the CNS symposium

After the CNS symposium on building a cumulative cognitive neuroscience, several people I talked to said it was a pity there wasn’t an online repository where all the sites that the speakers discussed could be accessed. I should have thought of that ahead of time, because even if we made one now, no one would … Continue reading links and slides from the CNS symposium

some thoughtful comments on automatic measure abbreviation

In the comments on my last post, Sanjay Srivastava had some excellent thoughts/concerns about the general approach of automating measure abbreviation using a genetic algorithm. They’re valid concerns that might come up for other people too, so I thought I’d discuss them here in more detail. Here’s Sanjay: Lew Goldberg emailed me a copy of … Continue reading some thoughtful comments on automatic measure abbreviation

abbreviating personality measures in R: a tutorial

A while back I blogged about a paper I wrote that uses genetic algorithms to abbreviate personality measures with minimal human intervention. In the paper, I promised to put the R code I used online, so that other people could download and use it. I put off doing that for a long time, because the … Continue reading abbreviating personality measures in R: a tutorial

fMRI becomes big, big science

There are probably lots of criteria you could use to determine the relative importance of different scientific disciplines, but the one I like best is the Largest Number of Authors on a Paper. Physicists have long had their hundred-authored papers (see for example this individual here; be sure to click on the “show all authors/affiliations” … Continue reading fMRI becomes big, big science

better tools for mining the scientific literature

Freethinker’s Asylum has a great post reviewing a number of tools designed to help researchers mine the scientific literature–an increasingly daunting task. The impetus for the post is this article in the latest issue of Nature (note: restricted access), but the FA post discusses a lot of tools that the Nature article doesn’t, and focuses … Continue reading better tools for mining the scientific literature