No, it’s not The Incentives—it’s you

There’s a narrative I find kind of troubling, but that unfortunately seems to be growing more common in science. The core idea is that the mere existence of perverse incentives is a valid and sufficient reason to knowingly behave in an antisocial way, just as long as one first acknowledges the existence of those perverse … Continue reading No, it’s not The Incentives—it’s you

whether or not you should pursue a career in science still depends mostly on that thing that is you

I took the plunge a couple of days ago and answered my first question on Quora. Since Brad Voytek won’t shut up about how great Quora is, I figured I should give it a whirl. So far, Brad is not wrong. The question in question is: “How much do you agree with Johnathan Katz’s advice … Continue reading whether or not you should pursue a career in science still depends mostly on that thing that is you

not really a pyramid scheme; maybe a giant cesspool of little white lies?

There’s a long tradition in the academic blogosphere (and the offlinesphere too, I presume) of complaining that academia is a pyramid scheme. In a strict sense, I guess you could liken academia to a pyramid scheme, inasmuch as there are fewer open positions at each ascending level, and supply generally exceeds demand. But as The … Continue reading not really a pyramid scheme; maybe a giant cesspool of little white lies?

more on the absence of brain training effects

A little while ago I blogged about the recent Owen et al Nature study on the (null) effects of cognitive training. My take on the study, which found essentially no effect of cognitive training on generalized cognitive performance, was largely positive. In response, Martin Walker, founder of Mind Sparke, maker of Brain Fitness Pro software, … Continue reading more on the absence of brain training effects

in praise of (lab) rotation

I did my PhD in psychology, but in a department that had close ties and collaborations with neuroscience. One of the interesting things about psychology and neuroscience programs is that they seem to have quite different graduate training models, even in cases where the area of research substantively overlaps (e.g., in cognitive neuroscience). In psychology, … Continue reading in praise of (lab) rotation