Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

In my last post, I wrote a long commentary on a recent PNAS article by Lieberman & Eisenberger claiming to find evidence that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is “selective for pain” using my Neurosynth framework for large-scale fMRI meta-analysis. I argued that nothing about Neurosynth supports any of L&E’s major conclusions, and that they … Continue reading Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

fMRI: coming soon to a courtroom near you?

Science magazine has a series of three (1, 2, 3) articles by Greg Miller over the past few days covering an interesting trial in Tennessee. The case itself seems like garden variety fraud, but the novel twist is that the defense is trying to introduce fMRI scans into the courtroom in order to establish the … Continue reading fMRI: coming soon to a courtroom near you?

everything we know about the neural bases of cognitive control, in 20 review articles or less

Okay, not everything. But a lot of what we know. The current issue of Current Opinion in Neurobiology, which features a special focus on cognitive neuroscience, contains are almost 20 short review papers, most of which focus on the neural mechanisms of cognitive control in one guise or another. As the Editors of the special … Continue reading everything we know about the neural bases of cognitive control, in 20 review articles or less

functional MRI and the many varieties of reliability

Craig Bennett and Mike Miller have a new paper on the reliability of fMRI. It’s a nice review that I think most people who work with fMRI will want to read. Bennett and Miller discuss a number of issues related to reliability, including why we should care about the reliability of fMRI, what factors influence … Continue reading functional MRI and the many varieties of reliability

on the limitations of psychiatry, or why bad drugs can be good too

The Neuroskeptic offers a scathing indictment of the notion, editoralized in Nature this week, that the next decade is going to revolutionize the understanding and treatment of psychiatric disorders: The 2010s is not the decade for psychiatric disorders. Clinically, that decade was the 1950s. The 50s was when the first generation of psychiatric drugs were … Continue reading on the limitations of psychiatry, or why bad drugs can be good too