CNS 2011: a first-person shorthand account in the manner of Rocky Steps

Friday, April 1 4 pm. Arrive at SFO International on bumpy flight from Denver. 4:45 pm. Approach well-dressed man downtown and open mouth to ask for directions to Hyatt Regency San Francisco. “Sorry,” says well-dressed man, “No change to give.” Back off slowly, swinging bags, beard, and poster tube wildly, mumbling “I’m not a panhandler, … Continue reading CNS 2011: a first-person shorthand account in the manner of Rocky Steps

links and slides from the CNS symposium

After the CNS symposium on building a cumulative cognitive neuroscience, several people I talked to said it was a pity there wasn’t an online repository where all the sites that the speakers discussed could be accessed. I should have thought of that ahead of time, because even if we made one now, no one would … Continue reading links and slides from the CNS symposium

CNS wrap-up

I’m back from CNS in Montreal (actually, I’m not quite back; I’m in Ottawa for a few days–but close enough). Some thoughts about the experience, in no particular order, and with very little sense: A huge number of registered attendees (basically, everyone from Europe who didn’t leave for Montreal early) couldn’t make it to the … Continue reading CNS wrap-up

the grand canada tour, 2010 edition

Blogging will be slow(er than normal) for the next couple of weeks. On Wednesday I’m off on a long-awaited Grand Tour of Canada, 2010 edition. The official purpose of the trip is the CNS meeting in Montreal, but seeing as I’m from Canada and most of my family is in Toronto and Ottawa, I’ll be … Continue reading the grand canada tour, 2010 edition

better tools for mining the scientific literature

Freethinker’s Asylum has a great post reviewing a number of tools designed to help researchers mine the scientific literature–an increasingly daunting task. The impetus for the post is this article in the latest issue of Nature (note: restricted access), but the FA post discusses a lot of tools that the Nature article doesn’t, and focuses … Continue reading better tools for mining the scientific literature

building a cumulative science of human brain function at CNS

Earlier today, I received an email saying that a symposium I submitted for the next CNS meeting was accepted for inclusion in the program. I’m pretty excited about this; I think the topic of the symposium is a really important one, and this will be a great venue to discuss some of the relevant issues. … Continue reading building a cumulative science of human brain function at CNS