There is no “tone” problem in psychology

Much ink has been spilled in the last week or so over the so-called “tone” problem in psychology, and what to do about it. I speak here, of course, of the now infamous (and as-yet unpublished) APS Observer column by APS Past President Susan Fiske, in which she argues rather strenuously that psychology is in danger of … Continue reading There is no “tone” problem in psychology

what the arsenic effect means for scientific publishing

I don’t know very much about DNA (and by ‘not very much’ I sadly mean ‘next to nothing’), so when someone tells me that life as we know it generally doesn’t use arsenic to make DNA, and that it’s a big deal to find a bacterium that does, I’m willing to believe them. So too, … Continue reading what the arsenic effect means for scientific publishing

scientists aren’t dumb; statistics is hard

There’s a feature article in the new issue of Science News on the failure of science “to face the shortcomings of statistics”. The author, Tom Siegfried, argues that many scientific results shouldn’t be believed because they depend on faulty statistical practices: Even when performed correctly, statistical tests are widely misunderstood and frequently misinterpreted. As a … Continue reading scientists aren’t dumb; statistics is hard