deconstructing the turducken

This is fiction. Which means it’s entirely made up, and definitely not at all based on any real people or events.   Cornelius Kipling came over to our house for Thanksgiving. I didn’t invite him; I would never, ever invite him. He was guaranteed to show up slightly drunk and very belligerent, carrying a two-thirds empty … Continue reading deconstructing the turducken

see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

  UPDATE: the webcast is now archived here for posterity. This is kind of late notice and probably of interest to few people, but I’m giving the NIF webinar tomorrow (or today, depending on your time zone–either way, we’re talking about November 1st). I’ll be talking about Neurosynth, and focusing in particular on the methods … Continue reading see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

elsewhere on the net, vacation edition

I’m hanging out in Boston for a few days, so blogging will probably be sporadic or nonexistent. Which is to say, you probably won’t notice any difference. The last post on the Dunning-Kruger effect somehow managed to rack up 10,000 hits in 48 hours; but that was last week. Today I looked at my stats … Continue reading elsewhere on the net, vacation edition

elsewhere on the net

Some neat links from the past few weeks: You Are No So Smart: A celebration of self-delusion. An excellent blog by journalist David McCraney that deconstructs common myths about the way the mind works. NPR has a great story by Jon Hamilton about the famous saga of Einstein’s brain and what it’s helped teach us … Continue reading elsewhere on the net

in defense of three of my favorite sayings

Seth Roberts takes issue with three popular maxims that (he argues) people use “to push away data that contradicts this or that approved view of the world”. He terms this preventive stupidity. I’m a frequent user of all three sayings, so I suppose that might make me preventively stupid; but I do feel like I … Continue reading in defense of three of my favorite sayings

in brief…

Some neat stuff from the past week or so: If you’ve ever wondered how to go about getting a commentary on an article published in a peer-reviewed journal, wonder no longer… you can’t. Or rather, you can, but it may not be worth your trouble. Rick Trebino explains. [new to me via A.C. Thomas, though … Continue reading in brief…

fMRI becomes big, big science

There are probably lots of criteria you could use to determine the relative importance of different scientific disciplines, but the one I like best is the Largest Number of Authors on a Paper. Physicists have long had their hundred-authored papers (see for example this individual here; be sure to click on the “show all authors/affiliations” … Continue reading fMRI becomes big, big science

the OKCupid guide to dating older women

Continuing along on their guided tour of Data I Wish I Had Access To, the OKCupid folks have posted another set of interesting figures on their blog. This time, they make the case for dating older women, suggesting that men might get more bang for their buck (in a literal sense, I suppose) by trying … Continue reading the OKCupid guide to dating older women

elsewhere on the internets…

The good people over at OKCupid, the best dating site on Earth (their words, not mine! I’m happily married!), just released a new slew of data on their OKTrends blog. Apparently men like women with smiley, flirty profile photos, and women like dismissive, unsmiling men. It’s pretty neat stuff, and definitely worth a read. Mating … Continue reading elsewhere on the internets…

tuesday at 3 pm works for me

Apparently, Tuesday at 3 pm is the best time to suggest as a meeting time–that’s when people have the most flexibility available in their schedule. At least, that’s the conclusion drawn by a study based on data from WhenIsGood, a free service that helps with meeting scheduling. There’s not much to the study beyond the … Continue reading tuesday at 3 pm works for me