Sixteen is not magic: Comment on Friston (2012)

UPDATE: I’ve posted a very classy email response from Friston here. In a “comments and controversies” piece published in NeuroImage last week, Karl Friston describes “Ten ironic rules for non-statistical reviewers”. As the title suggests, the piece is presented ironically; Friston frames it as a series of guidelines reviewers can follow in order to ensure … Continue reading Sixteen is not magic: Comment on Friston (2012)

what aspirin can tell us about the value of antidepressants

There’s a nice post on Science-Based Medicine by Harriet Hall pushing back (kind of) against the increasingly popular idea that antidepressants don’t work. For context, there have been a couple of large recent meta-analyses that used comprehensive FDA data on clinical trials of antidepressants (rather than only published studies, which are biased towards larger, statistically … Continue reading what aspirin can tell us about the value of antidepressants

no one really cares about anything-but-zero

Tangentially related to the last post, Games With Words has a post up soliciting opinions about the merit of effect sizes. The impetus is a discussion we had in the comments on his last post about Jonah Lehrer’s New Yorker article. It started with an obnoxious comment (mine, of course) and then rapidly devolved into … Continue reading no one really cares about anything-but-zero

the ‘decline effect’ doesn’t work that way

Over the last four or five years, there’s been a growing awareness in the scientific community that science is an imperfect process. Not that everyone used to think science was a crystal ball with a direct line to the universe or anything, but there does seem to be a growing recognition that scientists are human … Continue reading the ‘decline effect’ doesn’t work that way

cognitive training doesn’t work (much, if at all)

There’s a beautiful paper in Nature this week by Adrian Owen and colleagues that provides what’s probably as close to definitive evidence as you can get in any single study that “brain training” programs don’t work. Or at least, to the extent that they do work, the effects are so weak they’re probably not worth … Continue reading cognitive training doesn’t work (much, if at all)

Ioannidis on effect size inflation, with guest appearance by Bozo the Clown

Andrew Gelman posted a link on his blog today to a paper by John Ioannidis I hadn’t seen before. In many respects, it’s basically the same paper I wrote earlier this year as a commentary on the Vul et al “voodoo correlations” paper (the commentary was itself based largely on an earlier chapter I wrote … Continue reading Ioannidis on effect size inflation, with guest appearance by Bozo the Clown