Why I still won’t review for or publish with Elsevier–and think you shouldn’t either

In 2012, I signed the Cost of Knowledge pledge, and stopped reviewing for, and publishing in, all Elsevier journals. In the four years since, I’ve adhered closely to this policy; with a couple of exceptions (see below), I’ve turned down every review request I’ve received from an Elsevier-owned journal, and haven’t sent Elsevier journals any … Continue reading Why I still won’t review for or publish with Elsevier–and think you shouldn’t either

In defense of In Defense of Facebook

A long, long time ago (in social media terms), I wrote a post defending Facebook against accusations of ethical misconduct related to a newly-published study in PNAS. I won’t rehash the study, or the accusations, or my comments in any detail here; for that, you can read the original post (I also recommend reading this … Continue reading In defense of In Defense of Facebook

In defense of Facebook

[UPDATE July 1st: I’ve now posted some additional thoughts in a second post here.] It feels a bit strange to write this post’s title, because I don’t find myself defending Facebook very often. But there seems to be some discontent in the socialmediaverse at the moment over a new study in which Facebook data scientists … Continue reading In defense of Facebook

in praise of self-policing

It’s IRB week over at The Hardest Science; Sanjay has an excellent series of posts (1, 2, 3) discussing some proposed federal rule changes to the way IRBs oversee research. The short of it is that the proposed changes are mostly good news for people who do minimal risk-type research with human subjects (i.e., stuff … Continue reading in praise of self-policing