No, it’s not The Incentives—it’s you

There’s a narrative I find kind of troubling, but that unfortunately seems to be growing more common in science. The core idea is that the mere existence of perverse incentives is a valid and sufficient reason to knowingly behave in an antisocial way, just as long as one first acknowledges the existence of those perverse … Continue reading No, it’s not The Incentives—it’s you

“Open Source, Open Science” Meeting Report – March 2015

[The report below was collectively authored by participants at the Open Source, Open Science meeting, and has been cross-posted in other places.] On March 19th and 20th, the Center for Open Science hosted a small meeting in Charlottesville, VA, convened by COS and co-organized by Kaitlin Thaney (Mozilla Science Lab) and Titus Brown (UC Davis). People working … Continue reading “Open Source, Open Science” Meeting Report – March 2015

the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

You could be forgiven for thinking that academic psychologists have all suddenly turned into professional whistleblowers. Everywhere you look, interesting new papers are cropping up purporting to describe this or that common-yet-shady methodological practice, and telling us what we can collectively do to solve the problem and improve the quality of the published literature. In … Continue reading the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

in praise of self-policing

It’s IRB week over at The Hardest Science; Sanjay has an excellent series of posts (1, 2, 3) discussing some proposed federal rule changes to the way IRBs oversee research. The short of it is that the proposed changes are mostly good news for people who do minimal risk-type research with human subjects (i.e., stuff … Continue reading in praise of self-policing