Sixteen is not magic: Comment on Friston (2012)

UPDATE: I’ve posted a very classy email response from Friston here. In a “comments and controversies” piece published in NeuroImage last week, Karl Friston describes “Ten ironic rules for non-statistical reviewers”. As the title suggests, the piece is presented ironically; Friston frames it as a series of guidelines reviewers can follow in order to ensure … Continue reading Sixteen is not magic: Comment on Friston (2012)

time-on-task effects in fMRI research: why you should care

There’s a ubiquitous problem in experimental psychology studies that use behavioral measures that require participants to make speeded responses. The problem is that, in general, the longer people take to do something, the more likely they are to do it correctly. If I have you do a visual search task and ask you to tell … Continue reading time-on-task effects in fMRI research: why you should care