what exactly is it that 53% of neuroscience articles fail to do?

[UPDATE: Jake Westfall points out in the comments that the paper discussed here appears to have made a pretty fundamental mistake that I then carried over to my post. I’ve updated the post accordingly.] [UPDATE 2: the lead author has now responded and answered my initial question and some follow-up concerns.] A new paper in Nature Neuroscience … Continue reading what exactly is it that 53% of neuroscience articles fail to do?

a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

Tor Wager and I have a “news and views” piece in Nature Methods this week; we discuss a paper by Mantini and colleagues (in the same issue) introducing a new method for identifying functional brain homologies across different species–essentially, identifying brain regions in humans and monkeys that seem to do roughly the same thing even if they’re … Continue reading a human and a monkey walk into an fMRI scanner…

of postdocs and publishing models: two opportunities of (possible) interest

I don’t usually use this blog to advertise things (so please don’t send me requests to publicize your third cousin’s upcoming bar mitzvah), but I think these two opportunities are pretty cool. They also happen to be completely unrelated, but I’m too lazy to write two separate posts, so… Opportunity 1: We’re hiring! Well, not … Continue reading of postdocs and publishing models: two opportunities of (possible) interest

the naming of things

Let’s suppose you were charged with the important task of naming all the various subdisciplines of neuroscience that have anything to do with the field of research we now know as psychology. You might come up with some or all of the following terms, in no particular order: Neuropsychology Biological psychology Neurology Cognitive neuroscience Cognitive … Continue reading the naming of things

fMRI, not coming to a courtroom near you so soon after all

That’s a terribly constructed title, I know, but bear with me. A couple of weeks ago I blogged about a courtroom case in Tennessee where the defense was trying to introduce fMRI to the courtroom as a way of proving the defendant’s innocence (his brain, apparently, showed no signs of guilt). The judge’s verdict is … Continue reading fMRI, not coming to a courtroom near you so soon after all

elsewhere on the net

I’ve been swamped with work lately, so blogging has taken a backseat. I keep a text file on my desktop of interesting things I’d like to blog about; normally, about three-quarters of the links I paste into it go unblogged, but in the last couple of weeks it’s more like 98%. So here are some … Continue reading elsewhere on the net

what the general factor of intelligence is and isn’t, or why intuitive unitarianism is a lousy guide to the neurobiology of higher cognitive ability

This post shamelessly plagiarizes liberally borrows ideas from a much longer, more detailed, and just generally better post by Cosma Shalizi. I’m not apologetic, since I’m a firm believer in the notion that good ideas should be repeated often and loudly. So I’m going to be often and loud here, though I’ll try to be … Continue reading what the general factor of intelligence is and isn’t, or why intuitive unitarianism is a lousy guide to the neurobiology of higher cognitive ability

in praise of (lab) rotation

I did my PhD in psychology, but in a department that had close ties and collaborations with neuroscience. One of the interesting things about psychology and neuroscience programs is that they seem to have quite different graduate training models, even in cases where the area of research substantively overlaps (e.g., in cognitive neuroscience). In psychology, … Continue reading in praise of (lab) rotation