Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

In my last post, I wrote a long commentary on a recent PNAS article by Lieberman & Eisenberger claiming to find evidence that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is “selective for pain” using my Neurosynth framework for large-scale fMRI meta-analysis. I argued that nothing about Neurosynth supports any of L&E’s major conclusions, and that they … Continue reading Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

[Update 12/10/2015: Lieberman & Eisenberger have now posted a lengthy response to this post here. I’ll post my own reply to their reply in the next few days.] [Update 12/14/2015: I’ve posted an even lengthier reply to L&E’s reply here.] [Update 12/16/2015: Alex Shackman has posted an interesting┬ácommentary of his own on the L&E paper. … Continue reading No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

If you’ve visited the Neurosynth website lately, you may have noticed that it looks… the same way it’s always looked. It hasn’t really changed in the last ~20 months, despite the vague promise on the front page that in the next few months, we’re going to do X, Y, Z to improve the functionality. The … Continue reading the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

several half-truths, and one blatant, unrepenting lie about my recent whereabouts

Apparently time does a thing that is much like flying. Seems like just yesterday I was sitting here in this chair, sipping on martinis, and pleasantly humming old show tunes while cranking out several high-quality blog posts an hour a mediocre blog post every week or two. But then! Then I got distracted! And blinked! … Continue reading several half-truths, and one blatant, unrepenting lie about my recent whereabouts

unconference in Leipzig! no bathroom breaks!

Many (most?) regular readers of this blog have probably been to at least one academic conference. Some of you even have the misfortune of attending conferences regularly. And a still-smaller fraction of you scholarly deviants might conceivably even enjoy the freakish experience. You know, that whole thing where you get to roam around the streets … Continue reading unconference in Leipzig! no bathroom breaks!

Attention publishers: the data in your tables want to be free! Free!

The Neurosynth database is getting an upgrade over the next couple of weeks; it’s going to go from 4,393 neuroimaging studies to around 5,800. Unfortunately, updating the database is kind of a pain, because academic publishers like to change the format of their full-text HTML articles, which has a nasty habit of breaking the publisher-specific … Continue reading Attention publishers: the data in your tables want to be free! Free!

see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

  UPDATE: the webcast is now archived here for posterity. This is kind of late notice and probably of interest to few people, but I’m giving the NIF webinar tomorrow (or today, depending on your time zone–either way, we’re talking about November 1st). I’ll be talking about Neurosynth, and focusing in particular on the methods … Continue reading see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

the short but eventful magnetosensing life of cows

I’ve given several talks in the last few months about the Neurosynth framework, which is designed to help facilitate large-scale automated meta-analysis of fMRI data (see this paper, or these slides from my most recent talk). On a couple of occasions, I’ve decided to start out by talking about something other than brains. In particular, … Continue reading the short but eventful magnetosensing life of cows

in which I suffer a minor setback due to hyperbolic discounting

I wrote a paper with some collaborators that was officially published today in Nature Methods (though it’s been available online for a few weeks). I spent a year of my life on this (a YEAR! That’s like 30 years in opossum years!), so go read the abstract, just to humor me. It’s about large-scale automated … Continue reading in which I suffer a minor setback due to hyperbolic discounting