Now I am become DOI, destroyer of gatekeeping worlds

Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are much sought-after commodities in the world of academic publishing. If you’ve never seen one, a DOI is a unique string associated with a particular digital object (most commonly a publication of some kind) that lets the internet know where to find the stuff you’ve written. For example, say you want … Continue reading Now I am become DOI, destroyer of gatekeeping worlds

The reviewer’s dilemma, or why you shouldn’t get too meta when you’re supposed to be writing a review that’s already overdue

When I review papers for journals, I often find myself facing something of a tension between two competing motives. On the one hand, I’d like to evaluate each manuscript as an independent contribution to the scientific literature–i.e., without having to worry about how the manuscript stacks up against other potential manuscripts I could be reading. … Continue reading The reviewer’s dilemma, or why you shouldn’t get too meta when you’re supposed to be writing a review that’s already overdue

building better platforms for evaluating science: a request for feedback

UPDATE 4/20/2012: a revised version of the paper mentioned below is now available here. A couple of months ago I wrote about a call for papers for a special issue of Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience focusing on “Visions for Open Evaluation of Scientific Papers by Post-Publication Peer Review“. I wrote a paper for the issue, … Continue reading building better platforms for evaluating science: a request for feedback

younger and wiser?

Peer reviewers get worse as they age, not better. That’s the conclusion drawn by a study discussed in the latest issue of Nature. The study isn’t published yet, and it’s based on analysis of 1,400 reviews in just one biomedical journal (The Annals of Emergency Medicine), but there’s no obvious reason why these findings shouldn’t … Continue reading younger and wiser?