Now I am become DOI, destroyer of gatekeeping worlds

Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are much sought-after commodities in the world of academic publishing. If you’ve never seen one, a DOI is a unique string associated with a particular digital object (most commonly a publication of some kind) that lets the internet know where to find the stuff you’ve written. For example, say you want … Continue reading Now I am become DOI, destroyer of gatekeeping worlds

strong opinions about data sharing mandates–mine included

Apparently, many scientists have rather strong feelings about data sharing mandates. In the wake of PLOS’s recent announcement–which says that, effective now, all papers published in PLOS journals must deposit their data in a publicly accessible location–a veritable gaggle of scientists have taken to their blogs to voice their outrage and/or support for the policy. … Continue reading strong opinions about data sharing mandates–mine included

the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

You could be forgiven for thinking that academic psychologists have all suddenly turned into professional whistleblowers. Everywhere you look, interesting new papers are cropping up purporting to describe this or that common-yet-shady methodological practice, and telling us what we can collectively do to solve the problem and improve the quality of the published literature. In … Continue reading the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

The reviewer’s dilemma, or why you shouldn’t get too meta when you’re supposed to be writing a review that’s already overdue

When I review papers for journals, I often find myself facing something of a tension between two competing motives. On the one hand, I’d like to evaluate each manuscript as an independent contribution to the scientific literature–i.e., without having to worry about how the manuscript stacks up against other potential manuscripts I could be reading. … Continue reading The reviewer’s dilemma, or why you shouldn’t get too meta when you’re supposed to be writing a review that’s already overdue

building better platforms for evaluating science: a request for feedback

UPDATE 4/20/2012: a revised version of the paper mentioned below is now available here. A couple of months ago I wrote about a call for papers for a special issue of Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience focusing on “Visions for Open Evaluation of Scientific Papers by Post-Publication Peer Review“. I wrote a paper for the issue, … Continue reading building better platforms for evaluating science: a request for feedback

Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

Distinguishing good science from bad science isn’t an easy thing to do. One big problem is that what constitutes ‘good’ work is, to a large extent, subjective; I might love a paper you hate, or vice versa. Another problem is that science is a cumulative enterprise, and the value of each discovery is, in some … Continue reading Too much p = .048? Towards partial automation of scientific evaluation

of postdocs and publishing models: two opportunities of (possible) interest

I don’t usually use this blog to advertise things (so please don’t send me requests to publicize your third cousin’s upcoming bar mitzvah), but I think these two opportunities are pretty cool. They also happen to be completely unrelated, but I’m too lazy to write two separate posts, so… Opportunity 1: We’re hiring! Well, not … Continue reading of postdocs and publishing models: two opportunities of (possible) interest

The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

Unless you’ve been pleasantly napping under a rock for the last couple of months, there’s a good chance you’ve heard about a forthcoming article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (JPSP) purporting to provide strong evidence for the existence of some ESP-like phenomenon. (If you’ve been napping, see here, here, here, here, here, … Continue reading The psychology of parapsychology, or why good researchers publishing good articles in good journals can still get it totally wrong

how many Cortex publications in the hand is a Nature publication in the bush worth?

A provocative and very short Opinion piece by Julien Mayor (Are scientists nearsighted gamblers? The misleading nature of impact factors) was recently posted on the Frontiers in Psychology website (open access! yay!). Mayor’s argument is summed up nicely in this figure: The left panel plots the mean versus median number of citations per article in … Continue reading how many Cortex publications in the hand is a Nature publication in the bush worth?

what the arsenic effect means for scientific publishing

I don’t know very much about DNA (and by ‘not very much’ I sadly mean ‘next to nothing’), so when someone tells me that life as we know it generally doesn’t use arsenic to make DNA, and that it’s a big deal to find a bacterium that does, I’m willing to believe them. So too, … Continue reading what the arsenic effect means for scientific publishing