yet another Python state machine (and why you might care)

TL;DR: I wrote a minimalistic state machine implementation in Python. You can find the code on GitHub. The rest of this post explains what a state machine is and why you might (or might not) care. The post is slanted towards scientists who are technically inclined but lack formal training in computer science or software … Continue reading yet another Python state machine (and why you might care)

The homogenization of scientific computing, or why Python is steadily eating other languages’ lunch

Over the past two years, my scientific computing toolbox been steadily homogenizing. Around 2010 or 2011, my toolbox looked something like this: Ruby for text processing and miscellaneous scripting; Ruby on Rails/JavaScript for web development; Python/Numpy (mostly) and MATLAB (occasionally) for numerical computing; MATLAB for neuroimaging data analysis; R for statistical analysis; R for plotting … Continue reading The homogenization of scientific computing, or why Python is steadily eating other languages’ lunch

the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source

If you’ve visited the Neurosynth website lately, you may have noticed that it looks… the same way it’s always looked. It hasn’t really changed in the last ~20 months, despite the vague promise on the front page that in the next few months, we’re going to do X, Y, Z to improve the functionality. The … Continue reading the Neurosynth viewer goes modular and open source