There is no ceiling effect in Johnson, Cheung, & Donnellan (2014)

This is not a blog post about bullying, negative psychology or replication studies in general. Those are important issues, and a lot of ink has been spilled over them in the past week or two. But this post isn’t about those issues (at least, not directly). This post is about ceiling effects. Specifically, the ceiling … Continue reading There is no ceiling effect in Johnson, Cheung, & Donnellan (2014)

What we can and can’t learn from the Many Labs Replication Project

By now you will most likely have heard about the “Many Labs” Replication Project (MLRP)–a 36-site, 12-country, 6,344-subject effort to try to replicate a variety of classical and not-so-classical findings in psychology. You probably already know that the authors tested a variety of different effects–some recent, some not so recent (the oldest one dates back … Continue reading What we can and can’t learn from the Many Labs Replication Project

the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

You could be forgiven for thinking that academic psychologists have all suddenly turned into professional whistleblowers. Everywhere you look, interesting new papers are cropping up purporting to describe this or that common-yet-shady methodological practice, and telling us what we can collectively do to solve the problem and improve the quality of the published literature. In … Continue reading the truth is not optional: five bad reasons (and one mediocre one) for defending the status quo

tracking replication attempts in psychology–for real this time

I’ve written a few posts on this blog about how the development of better online infrastructure could help address and even solve many of the problems psychologists and other scientists face (e.g., the low reliability of peer review, the ‘fudge factor’ in statistical reporting, the sheer size of the scientific literature, etc.). Actually, that general … Continue reading tracking replication attempts in psychology–for real this time

the ‘decline effect’ doesn’t work that way

Over the last four or five years, there’s been a growing awareness in the scientific community that science is an imperfect process. Not that everyone used to think science was a crystal ball with a direct line to the universe or anything, but there does seem to be a growing recognition that scientists are human … Continue reading the ‘decline effect’ doesn’t work that way