In defense of In Defense of Facebook

A long, long time ago (in social media terms), I wrote a post defending Facebook against accusations of ethical misconduct related to a newly-published study in PNAS. I won’t rehash the study, or the accusations, or my comments in any detail here; for that, you can read the original post (I also recommend reading this … Continue reading In defense of In Defense of Facebook

a possible link between pesticides and ADHD

A forthcoming article in the journal Pediatrics that’s been getting a lot of press attention suggests that exposure to common pesticides may be associated with a substantially elevated risk of ADHD. More precisely, what the study found was that elevated urinary concentrations of organophosphate metabolites were associated with an increased likelihood of meeting criteria for … Continue reading a possible link between pesticides and ADHD

undergraduates are WEIRD

This month’s issue of Nature Neuroscience contains an editorial lambasting the excessive reliance of psychologists on undergraduate college samples, which, it turns out, are pretty unrepresentative of humanity at large. The impetus for the editorial is a mammoth in-press review of cross-cultural studies by Joseph Henrich and colleagues, which, the authors suggest, collectively indicate that … Continue reading undergraduates are WEIRD

cognitive training doesn’t work (much, if at all)

There’s a beautiful paper in Nature this week by Adrian Owen and colleagues that provides what’s probably as close to definitive evidence as you can get in any single study that “brain training” programs don’t work. Or at least, to the extent that they do work, the effects are so weak they’re probably not worth … Continue reading cognitive training doesn’t work (much, if at all)

internet use causes depression! or not.

I have a policy of not saying negative things about people (or places, or things) on this blog, and I think I’ve generally been pretty good about adhering to that policy. But I also think it’s important for scientists to speak up in cases where journalists or other scientists misrepresent scientific research in a way … Continue reading internet use causes depression! or not.

how to measure 200 personality scales in 200 items

One of the frustrating things about personality research–for both researchers and participants–is that personality is usually measured using self-report questionnaires, and filling out self-report questionnaires can take a very long time. It doesn’t have to take a very long time, mind you; some questionnaires are very short, like the widely-used Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), which … Continue reading how to measure 200 personality scales in 200 items

solving the file drawer problem by making the internet the drawer

UPDATE 11/22/2011 — Hal Pashler’s group at UCSD just introduced a new website called PsychFileDrawer¬†that’s vastly superior in every way to the prototype I mention in the post below; be sure to check it out! Science is a difficult enterprise, so scientists have many problems. One particularly nasty problem is the File Drawer Problem. The … Continue reading solving the file drawer problem by making the internet the drawer

the genetics of dog hair

Aside from containing about eleventy hundred papers on Ardi–our new 4.4 million year-old ancestor–this week’s issue of Science has an interesting article on the genetics of dog hair. What is there to know about dog hair, you ask? Well, it turns out that nearly all of the phenotypic variation in dog coats (curly, shaggy, short-haired, … Continue reading the genetics of dog hair

diamonds, beer, bars, and pandas: the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes

Apparently I missed this, but the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes were awarded a couple of days ago. There’s a lot of good stuff this year, so it’s hard to pick a favorite; you have people making diamonds from tequila,¬† demonstrating that beer bottles can crack human skulls, turning bras into facemasks, and reducing garbage mass … Continue reading diamonds, beer, bars, and pandas: the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes

younger and wiser?

Peer reviewers get worse as they age, not better. That’s the conclusion drawn by a study discussed in the latest issue of Nature. The study isn’t published yet, and it’s based on analysis of 1,400 reviews in just one biomedical journal (The Annals of Emergency Medicine), but there’s no obvious reason why these findings shouldn’t … Continue reading younger and wiser?