Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

In my last post, I wrote a long commentary on a recent PNAS article by Lieberman & Eisenberger claiming to find evidence that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is “selective for pain” using my Neurosynth framework for large-scale fMRI meta-analysis. I argued that nothing about Neurosynth supports any of L&E’s major conclusions, and that they … Continue reading Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

[Update 12/10/2015: Lieberman & Eisenberger have now posted a lengthy response to this post here. I’ll post my own reply to their reply in the next few days.] [Update 12/14/2015: I’ve posted an even lengthier reply to L&E’s reply here.] [Update 12/16/2015: Alex Shackman has posted an interesting commentary of his own on the L&E paper. … Continue reading No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

what Ben Parker wants you to know about neuroimaging

I have a short opinion piece in the latest issue of The European Health Psychologist that discusses some of the caveats and limits of functional MRI. It’s a short and (I think) pretty readable piece; I touch on a couple of issues I’ve discussed frequently in other papers as well as here on the blog–namely, … Continue reading what Ben Parker wants you to know about neuroimaging

the New York Times blows it big time on brain imaging

The New York Times has a terrible, terrible Op-Ed piece today by Martin Lindstrom (who I’m not going to link to, because I don’t want to throw any more bones his way). If you believe Lindstrom, you don’t just like your iPhone a lot; you love it. Literally. And the reason you love it, shockingly, … Continue reading the New York Times blows it big time on brain imaging