Tag Archives: tapeworms

in brief…

Some neat stuff from the past week or so:

  • If you’ve ever wondered how to go about getting a commentary on an article published in a peer-reviewed journal, wonder no longer… you can’t. Or rather, you can, but it may not be worth your trouble. Rick Trebino explains. [new to me via A.C. Thomas, though apparently this one's been around for a while.]
  • The data-driven life: A great article in the NYT magazine discusses the growing number of people who’re quantitatively recording the details of every aspect of their lives, from mood to glucose levels to movement patterns. I dabbled with this a few years ago, recording my mood, diet, and exercise levels for about 6 months. I’m not sure how much I learned that was actually useful, but if nothing else, it’s a fun exercise to play aroundwith a giant matrix of correlations that are all about YOU.
  • Cameron Neylon has an excellent post up defending the viability (and superiority) of the author-pays model of publication.
  • In typical fashion, Carl Zimmer has a wonderful blog up post explaining why tapeworms in Madagascar tell us something important about human evolution.
  • The World Bank, as you might expect, has accumulated a lot of economic data. For years, they’ve been selling it at a premium, but as of 2010 the World Development Indicators are completely free to access. via [via Flowing Data]
  • Every tried Jew’s Ear Juice? No? In China, you can–but not for long, if the government has its way. The NYT reports on efforts to eradicate Chinglish in public. Money quote:

“The purpose of signage is to be useful, not to be amusing,” said Zhao Huimin, the former Chinese ambassador to the United States who, as director general of the capital’s Foreign Affairs Office, has been leading the fight for linguistic standardization and sobriety.