Tag Archives: web 2.0

tuesday at 3 pm works for me

Apparently, Tuesday at 3 pm is the best time to suggest as a meeting time–that’s when people have the most flexibility available in their schedule. At least, that’s the conclusion drawn by a study based on data from WhenIsGood, a free service that helps with meeting scheduling. There’s not much to the study beyond the conclusion I just gave away; not surprisingly, people don’t like to meet before 10 or 11 am or after 4 pm, and there’s very little difference in availability across different days of the week.

What I find neat about this isn’t so much the results of the study itself as the fact that it was done at all. I’m a big proponent of using commercial website data for research purposes–I’m about to submit a paper that relies almost entirely on content pulled using the Blogger API, and am working on another project that makes extensive use of the Twitter API. The scope of the datasets one can assemble via these APIs is simply unparalleled; for example, there’s no way I could ever realistically collect writing samples of 50,000+ words from 500+ participants in a laboratory setting, yet the ability to programmatically access blogspot.com blog contents makes the task trivial. And of course, many websites collect data of a kind that just isn’t available off-line. For example, the folks at OKCupid are able to continuously pump out interesting data on people’s online dating habits because they have comprehensive data on interactions between literally millions of prospective dating partners. If you want to try to generate that sort of data off-line, I hope you have a really large lab.

Of course, I recognize that in this case, the WhenIsGood study really just amounts to a glorified press release. You can tell that’s what it is from the URL, which literally includes the “press/” directory in its path. So I’m certainly not naive enough to think that Web 2.0 companies are publishing interesting research based on their proprietary data solely out of the goodness of their hearts. Quite the opposite. But I think in this case the desire for publicity works in researchers’ favor: It’s precisely because virtually any press is considered good press that many of these websites would probably be happy to let researchers play with their massive (de-identified) datasets. It’s just that, so far, hardly anyone’s asked. The Web 2.0 world is a largely untapped resource that researchers (or at least, psychologists) are only just beginning to take advantage of.

I suspect that this will change in the relatively near future. Five or ten years from now, I imagine that a relatively large chunk of the research conducted in many area of psychology (particularly social and personality psychology) will rely heavily on massive datasets derived from commercial websites. And then we’ll all wonder in amazement at how we ever put up with the tediousness of collecting real-world data from two or three hundred college students at a time, when all of this online data was just lying around waiting for someone to come take a peek at it.