building a cumulative science of human brain function at CNS

Earlier today, I received an email saying that a symposium I submitted for the next CNS meeting was accepted for inclusion in the program. I’m pretty excited about this; I think the topic of the symposium is a really important one, and this will be a great venue to discuss some of the relevant issues. … Continue reading building a cumulative science of human brain function at CNS

solving the file drawer problem by making the internet the drawer

UPDATE 11/22/2011 — Hal Pashler’s group at UCSD just introduced a new website called PsychFileDrawer that’s vastly superior in every way to the prototype I mention in the post below; be sure to check it out! Science is a difficult enterprise, so scientists have many problems. One particularly nasty problem is the File Drawer Problem. The … Continue reading solving the file drawer problem by making the internet the drawer

Ioannidis on effect size inflation, with guest appearance by Bozo the Clown

Andrew Gelman posted a link on his blog today to a paper by John Ioannidis I hadn’t seen before. In many respects, it’s basically the same paper I wrote earlier this year as a commentary on the Vul et al “voodoo correlations” paper (the commentary was itself based largely on an earlier chapter I wrote … Continue reading Ioannidis on effect size inflation, with guest appearance by Bozo the Clown

more pretty pictures of brains

Google Reader‘s new recommendation engine is pretty nifty, and I find it gets it right most of the time. It just suggested this blog, which looks to be a nice (and growing) collection of neuro-related images. It’s an interesting set of pictures that go beyond the usual combination of brain slices and tractography images to … Continue reading more pretty pictures of brains

tuesday at 3 pm works for me

Apparently, Tuesday at 3 pm is the best time to suggest as a meeting time–that’s when people have the most flexibility available in their schedule. At least, that’s the conclusion drawn by a study based on data from WhenIsGood, a free service that helps with meeting scheduling. There’s not much to the study beyond the … Continue reading tuesday at 3 pm works for me

not a day over six

I was born twenty-nine years ago today. This isn’t particularly noteworthy–after all, there are few things as predictable as birthdays–except that all day today, people have been trying to scare me into thinking I’m old. Like somehow twenty-nine is the big one. Well, it isn’t the big one, and I’m not old. Telling me that … Continue reading not a day over six

the brain, in pictures, in newsweek

Newsweek has a beautiful set of graphics illustrating some of the things we’ve learned about the brain in recent years. One or two of the graphics are a bit hokey (e.g., the PET slides showing the effects of a seizure don’t show the same brain slices, and it’s unclear whether the color scales are equivalent), … Continue reading the brain, in pictures, in newsweek

i hate learning new things

Well, I don’t really hate learning new things. I actually quite like learning new things; what I don’t like is having to spend time learning new things. I find my tolerance for the unique kind of frustration associated with learning a new skill (you know, the kind that manifests itself in a series of “crap, … Continue reading i hate learning new things

the genetics of dog hair

Aside from containing about eleventy hundred papers on Ardi–our new 4.4 million year-old ancestor–this week’s issue of Science has an interesting article on the genetics of dog hair. What is there to know about dog hair, you ask? Well, it turns out that nearly all of the phenotypic variation in dog coats (curly, shaggy, short-haired, … Continue reading the genetics of dog hair