The Great Minds Journal Club discusses Westfall & Yarkoni (2016)

[Editorial note: The people and events described here are fictional. But the paper in question is quite real.] “Dearly Beloved,” The Graduate Student began. “We are gathered here to–” “Again?” Samantha interrupted. “Again with the Dearly Beloved speech? Can’t we just start a meeting like a normal journal club for once? We’re discussing papers here, … Continue reading The Great Minds Journal Club discusses Westfall & Yarkoni (2016)

Neurosynth is joining the Elsevier family

[Editorial note: this was originally posted on April 1, 2016. April 1 is a day marked by a general lack of seriousness. Interpret this post accordingly.] As many people who follow this blog will be aware, much of my research effort over the past few years has been dedicated to developing Neurosynth—a framework for large-scale, … Continue reading Neurosynth is joining the Elsevier family

Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

In my last post, I wrote a long commentary on a recent PNAS article by Lieberman & Eisenberger claiming to find evidence that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is “selective for pain” using my Neurosynth framework for large-scale fMRI meta-analysis. I argued that nothing about Neurosynth supports any of L&E’s major conclusions, and that they … Continue reading Still not selective: comment on comment on comment on Lieberman & Eisenberger (2015)

No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

[Update 12/10/2015: Lieberman & Eisenberger have now posted a lengthy response to this post here. I’ll post my own reply to their reply in the next few days.] [Update 12/14/2015: I’ve posted an even lengthier reply to L&E’s reply here.] [Update 12/16/2015: Alex Shackman has posted an interesting commentary of his own on the L&E paper. … Continue reading No, the dorsal anterior cingulate is not selective for pain: comment on Lieberman and Eisenberger (2015)

the mysterious inefficacy of weather

I like to think of myself as a data-respecting guy–by which I mean that I try to follow the data wherever it leads, and work hard to suppress my intuitions in cases where those intuitions are convincingly refuted by the empirical evidence. Over the years, I’ve managed to argue myself into believing many things that … Continue reading the mysterious inefficacy of weather

To increase sustainability, NIH should yoke success rates to budgets

There’s a general consensus among biomedical scientists working in the United States that the NIH funding system is in a state of serious debilitation, if not yet on life support. After years of flat budgets and an ever-increasing number of PIs, success rates for R01s (the primary research grant mechanism at NIH) are at an … Continue reading To increase sustainability, NIH should yoke success rates to budgets

“Open Source, Open Science” Meeting Report – March 2015

[The report below was collectively authored by participants at the Open Source, Open Science meeting, and has been cross-posted in other places.] On March 19th and 20th, the Center for Open Science hosted a small meeting in Charlottesville, VA, convened by COS and co-organized by Kaitlin Thaney (Mozilla Science Lab) and Titus Brown (UC Davis). People working … Continue reading “Open Source, Open Science” Meeting Report – March 2015

Now I am become DOI, destroyer of gatekeeping worlds

Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are much sought-after commodities in the world of academic publishing. If you’ve never seen one, a DOI is a unique string associated with a particular digital object (most commonly a publication of some kind) that lets the internet know where to find the stuff you’ve written. For example, say you want … Continue reading Now I am become DOI, destroyer of gatekeeping worlds

the weeble distribution: a love story

“I’m a statistician,” she wrote. “By day, I work for the census bureau. By night, I use my statistical skills to build the perfect profile. I’ve mastered the mysterious headline, the alluring photo, and the humorous description that comes off as playful but with a hint of an edge. I’m pretty much irresistible at this … Continue reading the weeble distribution: a love story

Internal consistency is overrated, or How I learned to stop worrying and love shorter measures, Part I

[This is the first of a two-part series motivating and introducing precis, a Python package for automated abbreviation of psychometric measures. In part I, I motivate the search for shorter measures by arguing that internal consistency is highly overrated. In part II, I describe some software that makes it relatively easy to act on this … Continue reading Internal consistency is overrated, or How I learned to stop worrying and love shorter measures, Part I