see me flub my powerpoint slides on NIF tv!

 

UPDATE: the webcast is now archived here for posterity.

This is kind of late notice and probably of interest to few people, but I’m giving the NIF webinar tomorrow (or today, depending on your time zone–either way, we’re talking about November 1st). I’ll be talking about Neurosynth, and focusing in particular on the methods and data, since that’s what NIF (which stands for Neuroscience Information Framework) is all about. Assuming all goes well, the webinar should start at 11 am PST. But since I haven’t done a webcast of any kind before, and have a surprising knack for breaking audiovisual equipment at a distance, all may not go well. Which I suppose could make for a more interesting presentation. In any case, here’s the abstract:

The explosive growth of the human neuroimaging literature has led to major advances in understanding of human brain function, but has also made aggregation and synthesis of neuroimaging findings increasingly difficult. In this webinar, I will describe a highly automated brain mapping framework called NeuroSynth that uses text mining, meta-analysis and machine learning techniques to generate a large database of mappings between neural and cognitive states. The NeuroSynth framework can be used to automatically conduct large-scale, high-quality neuroimaging meta-analyses, address long-standing inferential problems in the neuroimaging literature (e.g., how to infer cognitive states from distributed activity patterns), and support accurate ‘decoding’ of broad cognitive states from brain activity in both entire studies and individual human subjects. This webinar will focus on (a) the methods used to extract the data, (b) the structure of the resulting (publicly available) datasets, and (c) some major limitations of the current implementation. If time allows, I’ll also provide a walk-through of the associated web interface (http://neurosynth.org) and will provide concrete examples of some potential applications of the framework.

There’s some more info (including details about how to connect, which might be important) here. And now I’m off to prepare my slides. And script some evasive and totally non-committal answers to deploy in case of difficult questions from the peanut gallery respected audience.

links and slides from the CNS symposium

After the CNS symposium on building a cumulative cognitive neuroscience, several people I talked to said it was a pity there wasn’t an online repository where all the sites that the speakers discussed could be accessed. I should have thought of that ahead of time, because even if we made one now, no one would ever find it. So, belatedly, the best I can do is put together a list here, where I’m pretty sure no one’s ever going to read it.

Anyway, this is mostly from memory, so I may be forgetting some of the things people talked about, but here’s what I can remember:

Let me know if there’s anything I’m leaving out.

On a related note, several people at the conference asked me for my slides, but I promptly forgot who they were, so here they are.

UPDATED: Russ Poldrack’s slides are now also on the web here.